John S. Ott
Department of History
Portland State University
Spring 2021


HST 355U: Late Medieval Europe, 1100-1450
Remote, Asynchronous Course offered via D2L




How to connect with instructor:
How instructor will connect with you:
Where to find course materials and readings:
Senior auditors (must be registered through SALC):


Course overview

This course surveys the cultural, political, social, intellectual, and religious development of continental Europe between 1100 and approximately 1450, a period that encompasses the high and late Middle Ages.  We will survey the expansion and transformation of Europe, with special analysis given to the medieval Church and Christian religiosity on one hand, and, on the other, the impact on Christian Europe as its physical and intellectual boundaries were expanded and reconfigured by the rediscovery of classical tradition and through encounters with the peoples and cultures beyond its borders.  We will also consider the transformation of government and the emergence of the state, the changing status and place of women and the lower social orders of Europe, the impact of ecological disaster on European mentalities, and other topics.  This course is not a simple political/military history of the Middle Ages, and gives little to no attention to the Italian Renaissance, as that subject is covered in HST 356U: Renaissance and Reformation Europe, 1400-1600.

Course objectives
Course evaluation

Student evaluation will be structured around on-line discussion of and response to pre-circulated reading questions and written assignments. As the structure and success of the class depend on individual preparation and participation in online group discussion, each individual’s contribution to the class dynamic will be weighted in the assessment of grades. Guidelines for all assignments will be posted on-line (accessible via both D2L and the online course syllabus) in advance of deadlines. Student performance will be evaluated according to the following criteria:


Plagiarism policy

Plagiarism, intentional or unintentional, is an intolerable infraction in any setting where ideas are exchanged and discussed, and constitutes a violation of PSU’s Honor Code. Papers that can be shown to have been plagiarized will automatically receive a grade of “0”. Students will be required to resubmit their papers, and will be deducted in their grade an amount appropriate to the late paper policy given in the assignment guidelines. Repeated or particularly egregious offenses may be the cause for additional action. If you are unsure what constitutes plagiarism, you may test yourself at this web site maintained by Indiana University. Work completed for other classes may not be submitted for HST 355 and is considered by PSU a breach of academic honesty.  Remember, ignorance of what constitutes plagiarism is no excuse for doing it!

Accessibility notice

If you have, or think you may have, a disability that may affect your work in this class and feel you need accommodations, contact the Disability Resource Center to schedule an appointment and initiate a conversation about reasonable accommodations (https://www.pdx.edu/drc). Students who require additional consideration for the timely completion of any of the course requirements due to accessibility needs should speak to the instructor at the beginning of the term, and must be registered with PSU’s Disability Resource Center.

Title IX statement

Federal, state, and PSU policies require faculty members to mandatorily report any instances of sexual harassment, sexual violence and/or other forms of prohibited discrimination. PSU faculty are required by law to file a report if they have reasonable cause to believe that a child with whom they come into contact has suffered abuse, or that any person with whom they come into contact has abused a child. These reports are not confidential. Campus resources where reports may be made confidentially may be found by following this link.

Use of E-mail with instructor

E-mail can be a superb tool by which students communicate with the instructor with questions about the course material, the content, and the assignments. But please bear in mind the following:
Texts and materials

The following texts are required, and are available for purchase at the PSU Bookstore as well as online through booksellers.
Also, please note that several of our readings this quarter are available online or through Course reserves through Millar Library, and may be downloaded to computers or other devices.

Lectures

While is HST 355U is a ‘lecture’ course, the remote format necessitates some amendments to the typical in-class lecture. The instructor will record brief (< 20 minutes) mini-lectures to supplement the weekly readings and provide historical context. Students should read the assigned pages in Jordan, Europe in the High Middle Ages, for further background.



Syllabus
**Note: A typical course “week” will run from Monday to Sunday (ending at Midnight), with a final discussion response due on the following Wednesday (by Midnight).

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Week I (March 29 – April 4). Introduction to HST 355: The Eleventh-Century Crucible

    Do this week:
    Post:
    Read:
    Objectives:
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Week II (April 5 – April 11). Self, society, and history in medieval France

    Read:
    Consult:
    Watch:
    Discuss:
    Get/print:
    Objectives:
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Week III (April 12 – April 18). Urbanization and unrest / belief, wonder, and science

    Read:
    Watch:
    Discuss:
    Submit:
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Week IV (April 19 – April 25) The First Crusade (1095-1101) and the Byzantino-Islamic Mediterranean
   
    Read:
    Consult:
    Watch:
    Discuss:
    Submit:
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Week V (April 26 – May 2). Jews and Judaism / The Transformation of Religious Piety     
   
    Read:
    Consult:
    Watch:
    Discuss:
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Week VI (May 3 – May 9). Inquisition and pursuit of heretics

    Read:
    Consult:
    Watch:
    Discuss:
    Submit:
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Week VII (May 10 – May 16). Late Medieval Monarchies: the Papacy and Kingdoms of Europe

    Read:
    Consult:
    Watch:
    Discuss:
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Week VIII (May 17 – May 23). A Distant Mirror: Pandemic and Institutional Decline

    Read:
    Consult:
    Watch:
    Discuss:
    Submit:
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Week IX (May 24 – May 30). Chivalry, War, and Peasant Unrest

    Read:
    Optional reading:
    Consult:
    Watch:
    Discuss:
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Week X (May 31 – June 6). The Passionate Intensity of the Later Medieval World

    Read:
    Consult:
    Watch:
    Discuss:
    Submit:

***FINAL AT HOME EXAM IS DUE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, AT MIDNIGHT***